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Leaked Documents Show How Yelp Thinks It’s Getting Screwed By Google

Documents leaked to TechCrunch from inside Yelp allege that Google is manipulating its search results to favor Google+ content over Yelp content. The materials accuse Google of blatantly highlighting its own products in searches made in the US but not in Europe in order to avoid angering EU regulators who are reviewing Google antitrust complaints.

The source tells me these screenshots and study are what’s being passed around internally at Yelp to demonstrate that Google’s tactics are unfair. Yelp recently joined a formal complaint about the leniency of an EU antitrust settlement with Google, the New York Times reported today, and my source says these documents helped inspired this action.

Social DJ app Edjing revamped with new UI, deeper Deezer integration and universal search

Edjing, an app that allows users to mix tracks streaming from Deezer and other music services, has announced a significant update today which brings new social features, a refreshed UI and access to a larger music catalog.

The company says that the new version offers access to more than 50 million streaming tracks in total, 30 million of which come from Deezer, while the rest are from SoundCloud. Naturally, you can use locally stored files too. As part of its ongoing relationship with Deezer, the app also now includes Deezer’s own track recommendation tools like Top Charts, Deezer Picks and Themed Radio Channels. However, you will need to be a Deezer Premium+ subscriber to access all this goodness.

There’s also now a new area for keeping track of your creations called ‘Edjing World’, where you can also share mixes directly to Facebook, Twitter or Google+. There’s also the option to share them privately via other forms of messaging.

Rounding off the list of changes is the new global search option, which will return results from Deezer, SoundCloud and iTunes all in one list.

Edjing is available to download now for Windows 8, Android and iOS devices.

Featured Image Credit – Shutterstock

Use your Android Wear watch to snap photos with the updated Google Camera

Vimeo for Apple TV updated with simplified navigation, Vimeo On Demand, content filter, and more

Link: Social DJ app Edjing revamped with new UI, deeper Deezer integration and universal search

Use your Android Wear watch to snap photos with the updated Google Camera

The latest Google Camera update features the ability to take a photo using an Android Wear watch as a remote shutter. Selfies just got about 100 times better.

The update is available now from Google Play and adds a card to an Android Wear watch that appears when the app is launched on an tablet or smartphone. Tap the card and you get a three second countdown before a photo is taken by your Android device. A preview of the image you shot even shows up on your smartwatch.

0709 androidwearcamera 730x410 Use your Android Wear watch to snap photos with the updated Google Camera

While notifications are nice, it’s tiny little features like this that could make Android Wear devices must-have accessories. With today’s update to Google Camera, you can set a phone up, step back and take a photo of yourself or a photo or others all with a tap on your wrist.

The update is slowing rolling out to right now to users, but if you’re impatient, the fine folks at Android Police have an APK ready to be downloaded and installed.

➤ Google Camera for Android

Google now lets you mirror your Android phone and tablet on your TV with Chromecast

Go here to see the original: Use your Android Wear watch to snap photos with the updated Google Camera

YouTube is now publicly shaming internet providers that make its videos slow

Google Now gets a new ‘occasional’ reminder option for recurring tasks and events

Samsung Gear Live review: Finally a smartwatch you could wear every day

Google Now gets a new ‘occasional’ reminder option for recurring tasks and events

Samsung Gear Live review: Finally a smartwatch you could wear every day

Read the rest here: YouTube is now publicly shaming internet providers that make its videos slow

Google Now gets a new ‘occasional’ reminder option for recurring tasks and events

Google Now has added a new reminder option which will persistently dog you about to-dos or tasks on a semi-ongoing basis. The addition of the ‘occasionally’ reminder option, which was first spotted by Android Police, may not seem significant at first, but it throws up a couple of interesting usage options.

Rather than specifically setting up a task for a particular day, date or time — which is then dismissed and disappears from view forever — the new option keeps an ongoing reminder. At this early point, though, it isn’t clear how regularly that ‘occasional’ reminders will be shown to users.

Screenshot 2014 07 07 03.33.59 730x424 Google Now gets a new occasional reminder option for recurring tasks and events

Nonetheless, if you want to remind yourself to do (or be) something on a regular basis, without consigning the reminder to history by dismissing the alert, then Google Now has you covered. Although, whether services like Google Keep, Evernote, or other online to-do lists are better suited for the task is up to you.

Google Now Adds An ‘Occasionally’ Reminder Option, For When It’s Only Kinda Important [Android Police]

Thumbnail image via TNW, screenshot via Android Police

South Korea forces Apple and Google to revise app store terms for easier paid app refunds

Chronicunlocks circumvents iPhone Activation Lock feature for $150

The rest is here: Google Now gets a new ‘occasional’ reminder option for recurring tasks and events

Radical.fm takes its ‘pay-what-you-can’ music-streaming service to Android in the US

Almost a year after Radical.fm brought its ad-free ‘pay-what-you-can’ music-streaming service to iOS in the US, it’s finally arrived for Android users too.

We first covered the service way back in 2012, when it was available globally as a Web-only affair restricted mainly to artists from the non-major record labels. But it’s shifted focus slightly since then to mobile, and is now only available in the US.

That’s all very well and good, but its main differentiator for now is that it’s funded entirely from donations. You like it? You pay what you think it’s worth via PayPal, either as a one-time payment or a regular monthly fee.

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It follows a Pandora-like radio approach, with users able to ‘Like’ songs they’re presented with, and it bypasses algorithms for human curation. There are 25 million tracks available.

You can download the Android app from the link below, revisit the iOS incarnation, and we’re told a desktop version is in the pipeline too.

Radical.fm | Google Play

Feature Image Credit – Shutterstock

Amazon pushes back on FTC request to tighten in-app purchase procedure

Todoist now lets you set location-based reminders for all those important things you need to do

Excerpt from: Radical.fm takes its ‘pay-what-you-can’ music-streaming service to Android in the US

Google’s first 100 Ara beta testers will get the phone for free

Google buys curated playlist service Songza with no immediate plans to change the product

Project Ara might not be ready for actual use, but that hasn’t stopped Google from announcing the first 100 beta testers of the device. The kicker, they’re getting the modular phone for free.

On its dscout site, Google says that over 90,000 people signed up to be “scouts.” Of those, the company selected the top 100 most active scouts to receive the phone.

A statement in the announcement says that “over the next 8 months, Google will continue to refine the Ara prototype.” That puts the release of the device sometime in March 2015. Not surprising considering that the ATAP team had difficulty booting up the phone at I/O.

dscout

Google buys curated playlist service Songza with no immediate plans to change the product

Original post: Google’s first 100 Ara beta testers will get the phone for free

App: A Documentary About The Human Side Of The App Revolution

Those interested in how our culture shapes and is shaped by the software we use every day should check out “App: The Human Story,” a documentary project on Kickstarter that hopes to give an in-depth look at the impact apps have had since their introduction with the original iPhone in 2007:

Though they don’t expect to complete the project until December 2015, the team behind the documentary has already gotten some impressive names from the app development community, including Apple blogger and Vesper co-creator John Gruber, Instapaper creator Marco Arment, and MacWorld’s Jason Snell.

If you’re thinking that the teaser looks a tad Apple-centric, you’re right. Jake Schumacher, one of the project’s co-creators, told me in an email that he and fellow director Jedidiah Hurt were both heavy iOS and Mac users going into the project, so “it was easy to start listing interviews on the iOS side.” Since then, the team has started to look for developers on the Android side of things who similarly stand out in that community.

Schumacher also told me that they’re hoping they can bring in those shaping the Android operating system itself. His most wished-for appearances in the film: Sundar Pichai, the Google senior vice president in charge of Android, Chrome, and Google Apps, and Matias Duarte, the director in charge of Android’s user experience.

Considering the relative success of Indie Game: The Movie, a documentary that took a similar look at the people behind some of the more popular indie games in recent memory, you’d think that someone would have already put something like this together. While many of those involved have spent plenty of time blogging and podcasting on the topic, there’s nothing quite like App: The Human Story’s attempt to turn their open discussions into a single piece of media that anyone get into without context.

In another email, Hurt noted that they’re also going to create something special for those who do follow the film’s participants: instead of letting the hundreds of hours of interviews they film go to waste after editing cuts them down to the final running time, they’re going to edit out all of the “umms” and long pauses and offer it all as a perk for those who contribute $300 or more. Pricey, but not that bad if you’re someone who buys Daring Fireball shirts or pays for premium podcast subscriptions.

IMAGE BY Kickstarter

Visit link: App: A Documentary About The Human Side Of The App Revolution

No, The New Gmail API Is Not Killing IMAP

Yesterday, at Google’s I/O developer conference, the company announced a new way for developers to build apps that integrate with Gmail, via its brand-new Gmail API. Designed to allow programmatic access to messages, threads, labels and drafts, the API was initially misunderstood by some as Google’s attempt to “kill off IMAP,” an older email protocol that offers email access, retrieval and storage.

That confusion seemed to come about largely because of the wording in one highly trafficked Wall St. Journal article, which originally said that the new API would “replace IMAP, a common but complex way for applications to communicate with most email services.” (The article has since been updated with new language that says “instead of” as opposed to “replace.”)

Google’s developer’s documentation also backs this up: the new Gmail API will not be killing off IMAP  - at least, not yet – but it will make Gmail application development easier.

The Gmail API does not offer full inbox access for all operations, explains Google in a blog post detailing the API’s new features; it’s about giving fine-grained control to applications which don’t need “full-fledged email client access,” as the developer documentation states.

Instead, the API would work well for apps that need to scan through your inbox, looking for e-receipts, itineraries or order confirmations; those that let you schedule email to be sent later; CRM applications; email “snooze” buttons; and more. In these cases where full inbox access is not required, the Gmail API would be quicker than using IMAP to perform a search or find a particular email thread.

And while the Gmail API means Google is inviting developers to build ever more applications that dig into your most private social network – that of your email inbox – it’s also doing so in a way that actually better respects the sensitivity of that data.

Now, if a user wants to authorize an app that only performs one function, like sending mail on the user’s behalf, but not retrieving incoming messages, the Gmail API could allow for this, where before that same app built with IMAP would mean the developer would have to access all of your emails just to get their app to work.

However, the Gmail API stops short of enabling the lineup of mobile email clients, like Accompli, CloudMagic, Boxer or Gusto, for example. Those apps will still need to work with the older protocols like IMAP and SMTP, at least until Google decides to expand the Gmail API further to include all the functionality of IMAP, if the company ever chooses to go that route.

The Gmail API is now in beta, as Google solicits developer feedback before a wider launch.

Follow this link: No, The New Gmail API Is Not Killing IMAP

Google makes Android L Preview available to developers

The Pirates of Silicon Valley: Google’s ATAP team is ‘trying to do epic shit’

9 principles Google created for its colorful ‘Material Design’ UI refresh

Google has posted the links to the L Preview for developers to download after it announced L would be the next major version of Android to be released to the world later this year.

L preview brings more than 5000 new API’s to Android as well as a complete design overhaul featuring ‘material design’ elements and a number of new features. One of the focuses of L Preview is the unification of design languages across mobile, tablet and web.

googleio 2014 1421 730x486 Google makes Android L Preview available to developers

L Preview is only available for the Nexus 5 and Nexus 7 and is in an early preview stage so shouldn’t be installed on your main device. If you’re curious to give it a try but don’t have the right Nexus, you can download the Android SDK and try it out in the emulator.

Nexus 5/7 Android L Preview

The Pirates of Silicon Valley: Google’s ATAP team is ‘trying to do epic shit’

9 principles Google created for its colorful ‘Material Design’ UI refresh

Original post: Google makes Android L Preview available to developers